5 Misconceptions About Expats

Misconceptions of Expats in Italy Living abroad is probably the coolest things I’ve ever done. It’s a way to expose yourself to a new world that can teach you a lot about who you are and who you want to be. Plus, Europe is just gorgeous!

This article may be more geared to expat bloggers (or expats in Italy), since we are the ones who receive emails about our new city. Emails are great and I love receiving inquiries, but it’s not cool to email someone with tons of questions when they can search my blog or Google. Even worse, when they don’t reply after you’ve spent 30min on the email to ensure that you’re providing the best info so they have an incredible time in this new city that you love.

5 Misconceptions About Expats

There’s no need to get offended if you’ve done one or more of these things, as this post is more for the expats in the same situation. I’ve seen tweets from bloggers complaining about some of the things on this list, so I thought it was time to share my thoughts.

Read about the 4 personalities every expat needs.

1. You’re a travel agent

No, not quite. We just love where we live and curious enough to learn as much as possible, so we can have a great life and HEY, even write about it! Read our blog, it usually shares all you need to know…or most of what we’re willing to share.

2. You have no life or job

Expats have no life. We are waiting for emails from people asking how to meet an Italian man and where they should rent an apartment for two months. I love those emails.

3. Life is perfect

Everyday is the best day of my life because living abroad is supposed to be romantic and fairy-tale like so people can feel bad about their lives back home. Everyone has bad days, bad experiences and just a day you’re not so proud of… life happens to us all, expat or not.

4. You’re a historian

I actually love learning about the Renaissance and Tuscany’s history, but there’s no way I’m going to remember all that info. Please don’t think I’m less of a person just because I don’t know when Michelangelo was born. If you must know his birthday then tweet Alexandra!

5. Your home country rejected you

I’ve actually thought about this concerning other expats, then I realized that some people like to be out of their comfort zone and learning about another culture day in and day out. One day it just feels normal, even though I still pinch myself when I pass over the Arno River and gaze at Ponte Vecchio.

So, what are your thoughts?

Anything you’re bothered by since being an expat?

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  • Always love reading posts on life as an expat, it does sound idyllic but it’s not always as romantic and perfect as people expect!

  • Haha, ya I think life is what you make it and people can have great lives without ever being an expat 😉 although it’s an amazing experience I wouldn’t change for the world!

  • Sole Yoga Holidays

    YES to all of this, Tiana…ugh to #1, #2 & #4!!

  • Judith Umbria

    The one that hurts is when folks back home think expatriate means unpatriotic. They even spell is expatriot. The one that irritates is people thinking all of Italy is Tuscany. When you’ve lived in Umbria ten years or more, why do some ask you, “How’s life in Tuscany?”
    I dunno. Haven’t been there in almost a year.

  • Ha, ya it’s not always easy especially when people assume you are there just to be used!

  • Tuscany is Italy! Just kidding 😉 I can see how that can drive anyone mad. It’s like when I tell people I went to University in New Orleans and they assume Tulane, and I’m always proud to say “Nope, Loyola!”

  • The Guy

    Hi Tiana, it sounds like you have a very engaging readership although maybe very inquisitive.

    I can understand the frustration with all the time put into e-mails then not even a grateful acknowledgement back. Had so many of those myself.

    I think you paint a fair picture. Life is not always rosy and we are always learning about our new home. I spent a year and a half as an expat in Saudi Arabia of all places! I still know little about the country but I was happy to discover new things whilst I was there.

  • Ya, I am more than happy to help, which is why I love to blog. Just sometimes you get rude requests and demanding emails with no appreciation. I know fellow bloggers feel the same in some situations, so thought I would share my take.

  • Have recently found your blog, Moving to Italy in July so looking forward to reading through your posts and experiences!
    Lizzie

  • Thanks Lizzie!